New Adult Fiction

Bookworm3The Lost Art of Mixing by Erica Bauermeister: Restaurant owner Lillian manages an unexpected challenge while sharing her days with a circle of friends and regulars, including ritual-performing accountant Al, heartbroken chef Chloe, and unobtrusive giant Finnegan.

Hit Me by Lawrence Block: With a new wife and a baby on the way, Keller, a.k.a. Nicholas Edwards, is done killing people for money until a phone call from Dot draws him back into the old game, taking him to Dallas to settle a domestic dispute to New York, where people might remember him.

The Family Way by Bowen Rhys: Molly Murphy–now Molly Sullivan–is a year into her marriage, expecting her first child, and confined to the life of a housewife When a letter addressed to her old detective agency asking her to locate a missing Irish serving maid, Molly figures it couldn’t hurt to at least ask around, despite her promise to Daniel to give up her old career as a detective.    

Speaking from Among the Bones by C. Alan Bradley: When the tomb of St. Tancred is opened at a village church in Bishop’s Lacey, its shocking contents lead to another case for Flavia de Luce, where greed, pride and murder result in old secrets coming to light, along with a forgotten flower that hasn’t been seen for half a thousand years.

Buffalo Bill’s Dead Now by Margaret Coel: The regalia worn by Chief Black Heart in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show are to be returned to his people, but when the cartons arrived at the museum they were empty. Trevor Pratt, a rancher and Indian artifact collector, becomes the prime suspect until he is found murdered.

Deadly Stakesby Judith Jance: Contacted to investigate the gruesome murder of a gold-digging divorcee on behalf of the woman accused of the crime, police academy-trained former reporter Ali Reynolds is simultaneously drawn into another case that could be related.

Proof of Guilt by Charles Todd: When the clues in a hit-and-run investigation lead him to two families famous for producing and selling the world’s best Madeira wine, Scotland Yard’s Ian Rutledge is pitted against his new supervisor, who has his own suspect.

 

Roxi Reviews

Roxi Wilkinson has graciously agreed to share some of her recent reads with us. The following review is part of an ongoing series of guest posts written by Roxi:

The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult is an unforgettable novel that will live forever.  

Sage Singer is a modern day gifted baker working the night shift by choice. Making pastries and breads helps her escape the bad memories of her Mother’s death, or so she tells herself.

One day Joseph Weber, an elderly gentleman, stops in for coffee and turns her world upside-down. Though it is a very slow upside-down, Joseph sees in Sage the hidden scars of a haunted life much like his own. In searing honesty Joseph shares his hidden shame to his new best friend, Sage, and asks her for an extraordinary favor. Sage confronts the moral and ethical side of the lengths we will go to in order to protect our families and to keep history from repeating itself.

Jodi Picoult writes with precision, beauty and brutal honesty. This work of art far exceeds any other novel I have read in recent years.

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Reviews may be submitted for posting via our Contact form – we’d love to hear from you!

Basic Computer Skills Class

The Alliance Public Library is proud to be part of the 90% of libraries that offer digital literacy training!

We will be offering Basic Computers Skills on Friday, April 19th from 10am-noon and again on Thursday, April 25th from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. (rescheduled from the original date of April 18th due to a schedule conflict with the City Council meeting.)

A few seats are still available and may be reserved by contacting the library. The class will cover using a mouse, keyboard, windows, the internet, and email. If you or someone you know would benefit from this session, we’d love to have you!

Roxi Reviews

Roxi Wilkinson has graciously agreed to share some of her recent reads with us. The following review is part of an ongoing series of guest posts written by Roxi:

The Brutal Telling by Louise Penny is a novel of suspense, mystery and travel in beautiful Canada and the hidden St. Charlotte Islands. Three Pines is a peaceful tourist village, at least it was peaceful until a dead stranger is found on the floor of Oliver’s Bistro. Chief Inspector Gamache is called to investigate finding holes in Oliver’s story and his fingerprints all over the hermit’s reclusive cabin. The ‘who-done-it?’ question hammers away until the very last page. The Brutal Telling is full of colorful characters, stories within stories, evil at every turn and hope. From Louise Penny’s books I learn, I ponder long after the story is finished, and I recommend this read. 

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Reviews may be submitted for posting via our Contact form – we’d love to hear from you!

Based on the Book

Well, after a few days of ice and snow, we’re back in business. I thought I would share a based on the book post today. The award winning movie Lincoln starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Sally Fields is based in part on the book Team of Rivals: the political genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin. The film focuses on the 16th president’s tumultuous final months in office. In a nation divided by war and the strong winds of change, Lincoln pursues a course of action designed to end the war, unite the country, and abolish slavery. With the moral courage and fierce determination to succeed, his choices during this critical moment will change the fate of generations to come.

The DVD has recently been added to our collection and is available for checkout in addition to the Team of Rivals book by Goodwin.

 

 

Roxi Reviews

Roxi Wilkinson has graciously agreed to share some of her recent reads with us. The following review is part of an ongoing series of guest posts written by Roxi:

The Beautiful Mystery by Louise Penny is a novel about the monestary Saint-Gilbert-Entreles-Loups, hidden deep in the wilderness of Quebec. The two dozen cloistered monks grow their own vegetables, raise chickens, make chocolate covered wild blueberries and sing. For a cloister that has taken the vow of silence they are world famous for their voices intoning ancient chants. These unbelievably beautiful chants affect the pleasure center in the brain in such a manner that they are known as “the beautiful mystery”.

When their famous choir director is found murdered, the lock is drawn to allow the first civilians entrance to the monastery, Chief Inspector Gamache and Beauvoir of the Surete du Quebec. What the detectives find is both divine and terribly human. The “who-done-it” suspense keeps the reader on a tight rope and the ending is not quite the Disney-happy-happy I expected from a monastic tale.

I listen to my CD of monks chanting beautiful ancient melodies and have always found the cloistered life intriguing though I am not Catholic.  I read this book during the Vatican’s vote for the new Pope which coincided with endless news of sex abuse scandal within the church.

The Beautiful Mystery is a read with deep allegoric tones and an age old tale of good and evil. It has enhanced my Lenten season meditations.

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Reviews may be submitted for posting via our Contact form – we’d love to hear from you!