New Fiction

You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott: How far will you go to achieve a dream? That’s the question a celebrated coach poses to Katie and Eric Knox after he sees their daughter Devon, a gymnastics prodigy and Olympic hopeful, compete. For the Knoxes there are no limits–until a violent death rocks their close-knit gymnastics community and everything they have worked so hard for is suddenly at risk.

Spinning the Moon by Karen White: Time and again, New York Times bestselling author Karen White has proven herself to be the “ultimate voice of women’s fiction.” Now you can revisit the emergence of her signature style in two of her earliest novels–completely revised and together in one volume for the first time.

Rushing Waters by Danielle Steel: People from different walks of life are thrust together when a major hurricane descends upon New York City and wreaks unimaginable chaos and devastation. Yet through the darkness they manage to find hope and revitalization.

Damaged by Lisa Scottoline: After suing the Philadelphia school district to get help for a middle school boy with emotional issues, Mary ends up becoming the guardian ad litem of her minor client. As she goes up against Nick Machiavelli, her opposing counsel and the dark prince of South Philly lawyers who will use any means necessary to defeat her, she becomes more and more invested in the case.

The Last Days of Night by Graham Moore: A young lawyer named Paul Cravath takes a case that seems impossible to win. Paul’s client, George Westinghouse, has been sued by Thomas Edison over a billion-dollar question: Who invented the light bulb and holds the right to power the country?

The Wish by Beverly Lewis: Years after her friend Gloria’s family was expelled from the Old Order church, Leona unexpectedly hears from Gloria and endeavors to convince her to rejoin the Amish church, but Leona’s fiancé has reservations about her mission.

Killer Look by Linda Fairstein: High fashion means high stakes when businessman and designer Wolf Savage is found dead in an apparent suicide, mere days before the biggest show of his career. When the man’s daughter insists Savage’s death was murder, the case becomes more than a media sensation: It is a race to find a killer in a world created entirely out of fantasy and illusion.

An Obvious Fact by Craig Johnson: A young biker is run off the road and ends up in critical condition. When Sheriff Walt Longmire and Henry Standing Bear are called to Hulett, Wyoming, to investigate, things start getting complicated. It rapidly becomes clear that there is more to get to the bottom of at this year’s Sturgis Motorcycle Rally than a bike accident.

Razor Girl by Carl Hiaasen: When Lane Coolman’s car is bashed from behind, what appears to be an innocent accident is anything but. Behind the wheel is Merry Mansfield–the eponymous Razor Girl–so named for her unique, eye-popping addition to what might be an otherwise unexciting scam. But, of course, the scam is only the very beginning of a situation that’s going to spiral crazily out of control.

 

New DVDs

movie nightBatman v. Superman: Fearing the actions of Superman are being left unchecked, Batman takes him on, while the world wrestles with what kind of a hero it really needs. With Batman and Superman fighting each other, a new threat, Doomsday, is created by Lex Luthor. Starring Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill.

 A Hologram for the King: In a rising Saudi Arabian city, far from weary, recession-scarred America, a struggling businessman named Alan Clay pursues a last-ditch attempt to stave off foreclosure, pay his daughter’s college tuition, and finally do something great. Starring Tom Hanks based on the novel by Dave Eggers.

Me Before You: Louisa ‘Lou’ Clark lives in a quaint town in the English countryside. With no clear direction in her life, she takes a job at the local ‘castle’ and becomes caregiver and companion to Will Traynor, a wealthy young banker who became wheelchair bound in an accident. Both Lou and Will get more than they bargained for. Based on the novel by Jojo Moyes.

Triple 9: A bank robbery is just the tip of the iceberg when two cops in Atlanta start suspecting members of their own team are involved. Not knowing who to trust and how deep the corruption goes, time is ticking for them to uncover the truth, before they become the target for the next deadly job. Starring Casey Affleck, Woody Harrelson, and Kate Winslet.

The Finest Hours: In February of 1952, one of the worst storms to ever hit the East Coast struck New England, damaging an oil tanker off the coast of Cape Cod and literally ripping it in half. On a small lifeboat faced with frigid temperatures and 70-foot high waves, four members of the Coast Guard set out to rescue the more than 30 stranded sailors. Based on a true story and starring Casey Affleck.

Mother’s Day: This celebration of mothers everywhere invites all to enjoy the laughter, tears and love as three generations come together in the week leading up to Mother’s Day. Starring Jennifer Aniston, Kate Hudson, Julia Roberts, and Jason Sudeikis.

Sisters: The story of two disconnected sisters summoned home to clean out their childhood bedroom before their parents sell the family house. Looking to recapture their glory days, they throw one final high-school-style party for their classmates. Starring Amy Poehler and Tina Fey.

The Hunt: Take an intimate look at the remarkable strategies of hunters and in some cases, the hunted, exploring the challenges animals face and the tactics they employ both on land and in the water. It is a celebration of nature’s most determined, specialized and cunning predators and their equally cunning and elusive prey. Starring David Attenborough

Baby Mama: Kate is a businesswoman who, at 37, has decided to have a child on her own. Unable to get pregnant, a driven Kate allows South Philly working girl Angie Ostrowiski to become her unlikely surrogate. In a battle of wills, they prepare for the baby’s arrival. They soon discover that there are two kinds of family: the one you’re born to and the one you make. Starring Tina Fey and Amy Poehler.

New Nonfiction

The World According to Star Wars by Cass Sunstein: Explores the lessons of Star Wars as they relate to childhood, fathers, the Dark Side, rebellion, and redemption. As it turns out, Star Wars also has a lot to teach us about constitutional law, economics, and political uprisings. Sunstein tells the story of the films’ wildly unanticipated success and explores why some things succeed while others fail.

 Perfume River by Robert Olen Butler: Tenured professor Robert Quinlan finds himself in a stalwart marriage with a brother he won’t speak to and a father on his death bed. when an unstable homeless man whom Robert at first takes to be a fellow Vietnam veteran turns out to have a deep impact not just on Robert, but on his entire family.

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur: Milk and honey is a collection of poetry and prose about survival that takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

The Day the President was Shot by Bill O’Reilly: A chronicle of the events leading up to the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan. Includes a discussion of the aftermath and provides biographical information on the former president.

Harry Potter: the artifact vault by Judy Revenson: Chronicles the work of the graphics department in creating vibrant and imaginative labels for potions bottles, brooms, and candy; the creation of Quidditch Quaffles, Bludgers, and Golden Snitches, lovingly crafted by the prop making team; and the stunning inventiveness used by the entire crew to create a rich, bewitched filmic universe.

Outlander Kitchen by Theresa Carle-Sanders: Professional chef and founder of OutlanderKitchen.com Theresa Carle-Sanders offers up this extraordinary cuisine for your table. Featuring more than one hundred recipes, “Outlander Kitchen” retells Claire and Jamie’s incredible story through the flavors of the Scottish Highlands, the French Revolution, and beyond.

Liars by Glenn Beck: In his signature no-holds-barred way, Beck destroys the false promises of Progressivism and takes us through its history, showing how each “wave” built up on the one before it, ultimately washing up to the beach in the form of Barack Obama—and whoever is next.

Storm Over Leyte by John Prados: Gives readers an unprecedented look at both sides of this titanic naval clash, demonstrating that, despite the Americans’ overwhelming superiority in firepower and supplies, the Japanese achieved their goal, inflicting grave damage on U.S. forces. Provides access to naval intelligence reports that influenced key strategic decisions on both sides.

The Mathews Men by William Geroux: One of the last unheralded heroic stories of World War II: the U-boat assault off the American coast against the men of the U.S. Merchant Marine who were supplying the European war, and one community’s monumental contribution to that effort.

New Fiction

The House at the Edge of Night by Catherine Banner: Follows the lives of the Esposito family and the other islanders who live and love on Castellamare who are transformed by two world wars and a great recession, by the threat of fascism and their deep bonds of passion and friendship, and by bitter rivalries and the power of forgiveness.

Perfume River by Robert Olen Butler: Tenured professor Robert Quinlan finds himself in a stalwart marriage with a brother he won’t speak to and a father on his death bed. when an unstable homeless man whom Robert at first takes to be a fellow Vietnam veteran turns out to have a deep impact not just on Robert, but on his entire family.

Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers: Josie and her husband have split up, and when her ex asks to take the children to meet his new fiancé’s family, Josie makes a run for it, figuring Alaska is about as far as she can get without a passport. But as they drive, pushed north by wildfires, Josie is chased by enemies both real and imagined, past mistakes pursuing her tiny family to the edge of civilization.

Belgravia by Julian Fellowes: Two families living in 1840s London must guard a secret that originated at the Duchess of Richmond’s legendary ball on the eve of the Battle of Waterloo.

Among the Wicked by Linda Castillo: Kate Burkholder is called upon by the sheriff’s department in rural, upstate New York to assist on a situation that involves a reclusive Amish settlement and the death of a young girl. Kate travels to New York, poses as an Amish woman, and infiltrates the community.

Night and Day by Iris Johansen: Protecting Cara Delaney from the enemies who want her dead leads Eve to be their target. It will take everything she has to rescue Cara, and doing so will put that which is dearest to her at risk.

The Fisherman by John Langan:  When Abe and Dan, two widowers who have found solace in each other’s company and a shared passion for fishing, hear rumors of a Creek with the possibility of a catch more fantastic than fish, the men find themselves drawn into a tale as deep and old as the Reservoir.

Chase by James Patterson: A man plunges to his death from the roof of a Manhattan hotel. It looks like a suicide – except the victim has someone else’s fingerprints and $10,000 in cash. Enter Detective Michael Bennett.

Barkskins by Annie Proulx: Rene Sel, an illiterate woodsman, makes his way from Northern France to the homeland to seek a living. Proulx tells the stories of Rene’s children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren, as well as the descendants of his friends and foes, as they travel back to Europe, to China, to New England, always in quest of a livelihood or fleeing stunningly brutal conditions–war, pestilence, Indian attacks, the revenge of rivals.

New Fiction

The House at the Edge of Night by Catherine Banner: Follows the lives of the Esposito family and the other islanders who live and love on Castellamare who are transformed by two world wars and a great recession, by the threat of fascism and their deep bonds of passion and friendship, and by bitter rivalries and the power of forgiveness.

Perfume River by Robert Olen Butler: Tenured professor Robert Quinlan finds himself in a stalwart marriage with a brother he won’t speak to and a father on his death bed. when an unstable homeless man whom Robert at first takes to be a fellow Vietnam veteran turns out to have a deep impact not just on Robert, but on his entire family.

Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers: Josie and her husband have split up, and when her ex asks to take the children to meet his new fiancé’s family, Josie makes a run for it, figuring Alaska is about as far as she can get without a passport. But as they drive, pushed north by wildfires, Josie is chased by enemies both real and imagined, past mistakes pursuing her tiny family to the edge of civilization.

Belgravia by Julian Fellowes: Two families living in 1840s London must guard a secret that originated at the Duchess of Richmond’s legendary ball on the eve of the Battle of Waterloo.

Among the Wicked by Linda Castillo: Kate Burkholder is called upon by the sheriff’s department in rural, upstate New York to assist on a situation that involves a reclusive Amish settlement and the death of a young girl. Kate travels to New York, poses as an Amish woman, and infiltrates the community.

Night and Day by Iris Johansen: Protecting Cara Delaney from the enemies who want her dead leads Eve to be their target. It will take everything she has to rescue Cara, and doing so will put that which is dearest to her at risk.

The Fisherman by John Langan: When Abe and Dan, two widowers who have found solace in each other’s company and a shared passion for fishing, hear rumors of a Creek with the possibility of a catch more fantastic than fish, the men find themselves drawn into a tale as deep and old as the Reservoir.

Chase by James Patterson: A man plunges to his death from the roof of a Manhattan hotel. It looks like a suicide – except the victim has someone else’s fingerprints and $10,000 in cash. Enter Detective Michael Bennett.

Barkskins by Annie Proulx: Rene Sel, an illiterate woodsman, makes his way from Northern France to the homeland to seek a living. Proulx tells the stories of Rene’s children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren, as well as the descendants of his friends and foes, as they travel back to Europe, to China, to New England, always in quest of a livelihood or fleeing stunningly brutal conditions–war, pestilence, Indian attacks, the revenge of rivals.

New Fiction

Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty: Sam and Clementine have a busy life as working parents, but they can always count on each other. The two agree to go to a barbecue with friends, and afterwards it won’t stop raining, and Clementine and Sam can’t stop asking themselves the question: What if we hadn’t gone?

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling: As an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband, and a father, Harry Potter struggles with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs while his youngest son, Albus finds the weight of the family legacy difficult to bear.

Nine Women, One Dress by Jane Rosen: A charming, hilarious, irresistible romp of a novel that brings together nine unrelated women, each touched by the same little black dress that weaves through their lives, bringing a little magic with it.

The Hopefuls by Jennifer Close: Laced with sly humor and insider detail, Jennifer Close’s new novel tells the story of a young wife who follows her husband and his political dreams to DC, a city of idealism, ambition and complicated friendships among young Washington’s aspiring elite.

Dark Matter by Blake Crouch: Jason Dessen awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. In this world he’s woken up to, Jason’s life is not the one he knows. His wife is not his wife. His son was never born. And Jason is not an ordinary college physics professor, but a celebrated genius who has achieved something remarkable. Something impossible.

The Light of Paris by Eleanor Brown: Madeleine, who is unhappy in a failing marriage, finds a diary detailing her grandmother’s romantic trip to Jazz Age Paris. She decides to return to her hometown and stay with her critical, disapproving mother. Shaken by the revelation of a long-hidden family secret and inspired by her grandmother’s bravery, Madeleine creates her own Parisian summer.

The Bones of Paradise by Jonis Agee (Nebraska Author): Ten years after the massacre at Wounded Knee, J.B. Bennett, a white rancher, and Star, a young Native American woman, are murdered in a remote meadow on J.B.’s land. The deaths bring together the scattered members of the Bennett family exposing dark secrets and the conflicted heart of a nation caught between past and future.

The Muse by Jessie Burton: Odelle Bastien, a Caribbean émigré living in London in 1967, discovers a painting rumored to be the work of Isaac Robles, a young artist of immense talent and vision whose mysterious death has confounded the art world for decades.

Die Like an Eagle by Donna Andrews: Meg tangles with Biff Brown, the petty, vindictive league head. On baseball season’s opening day, Biff’s lookalike brother is found dead in the porta-potty at the ball field. So many people think Biff’s scum that it would be easy to blame him, but he has an alibi and Meg suspects he may actually have been the intended victim.