New Fiction Titles

Hag-seed by Margaret Atwood: Felix, a theatre producer, attempts to exact revenge for the past through a prison theatre course where Felix and his inmate actors will put on his version of the Tempest and snare the traitors who destroyed him. It’s magic! But will it remake Felix as his enemies fall?

Winter’s Child by Margaret Coel: Myra and Eldon Little Shield found an abandoned baby on their doorstep. Five years later, they are determined to adopt until someone tries to derail the process. Vicky soon unravels a connection –only to uncover one of the darkest secrets in Wind River’s history.

Pirate by Clive Cussler: An 800-year-old treasure. An ancient cypher wheel. A brutal murder. And a man who will stop at nothing to claim what he considers rightfully his. Never have Sam and Remi Fargo faced an adversary as determined as the one before them now.

Nutshell by Ian McEwan: Trudy has betrayed her husband, John. She’s still in the marital home–a dilapidated, priceless London townhouse–but John’s not here. Instead, she’s with his brother, the profoundly banal Claude, and the two of them have a plan. But there is a witness to their plot: the inquisitive, nine-month-old resident of Trudy’s womb.

Woman of God by James Patterson: From a difficult childhood with drug addled parents, to a career as a doctor on the front lines in Sudan, to a series of trials that test her faith at every turn, Brigid Fitzgerald’s convictions and callings have made her the target of all those who fear that the Church has lost its way–dangerous adversaries who abhor challenges to tradition.

Two by Two by Nicholas Sparks: At 32, Russell Green is living the dream, and his marriage to the bewitching Vivian is the center of that. But underneath the shiny surface of this perfect existence, fault lines are beginning to appear…and no one is more surprised than Russ when he finds every aspect of the life he took for granted turned upside down.

Crimson Death by Laurell K. Hamilton: The vampire who created Damian might be losing control, allowing rogue vampires to run wild and break one of their kind’s few strict taboos. When Anita joins forces with her friend Edward to stop the carnage, Damian will be at their side, even if it means traveling back to the land where all his nightmares spring from.

Ghost Times Two by Carolyn Hart: Bailey Ruth Raeburn’s latest mission is to guide the happy-go-lucky spirit of a deceased young man named Jimmy to the next life. But Jimmy is determined to watch over his still-living girlfriend Megan, whom he wants to be happy even without him.

Home by Harlan Coben: A decade ago, kidnappers grabbed two boys from wealthy families and demanded ransom, then went silent. No trace of the boys ever surfaced. For ten years their families have been left with nothing but memories and a desperation for the day that has finally, miraculously arrived: Myron Bolitar and his friend Win believe they have located one of the boys, now a teenager.

New Nonfiction Titles

Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance: Shares the story of the author’s family and upbringing, describing how they moved from poverty to an upwardly mobile clan that included the author, a Yale Law School graduate, while navigating the demands of middle class life and the collective demons of the past.

Ego is the Enemy by Ryan Holiday: The author shares his philosophy that much of our history is made by individuals who fought their egos at every turn, who eschewed the spotlight, and who put their higher goals above their desire for recognition.

Halloween: the history of America’s darkest holiday by David Skal: Skal examines the tradition’s dark Celtic history and traces its evolution in the course of a few generations from a quaint, small-scale celebration to a mammoth marketing event.

Murder in the Bayou by Ethan Brown: An explosive, true-life southern gothic story, Murder in the Bayou chronicles the twists and turns of a high-stakes investigation into the murders of eight women in a troubled Louisiana parish.

White Trash by Nancy Isenberg: Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over four hundred years, history professor Nancy Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society — where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility.

Making Work Work by Shola Richards: This book focuses on inspiring current and future leaders to start a movement that will banish on-the-job bullying, put meaning back into work, and enhance coworkers’ happiness and engagement.

I Contain Multitudes by Ed Yong: his book lets us peer into the world of microbes — not as germs to be eradicated, but as invaluable parts of our lives — allowing us to see how ubiquitous and vital microbes are: they sculpt our organs, defend us from disease, break down our food, educate our immune systems, guide our behavior, bombard our genomes with their genes, and grant us incredible abilities.

Love Warrior by Glennon Doyle Melton: Traces the author’s journey of self-discovery after the dissolution of her marriage, revealing how she found healing by rejecting gender standards and refusing to settle for a “good-enough” life.

Present Over Perfect by Shauna Neiquist: A collection of essays that focuses on the most important transformation in Niequist’s life, and maybe yours, too: leaving behind busyness and frantic living and rediscovering the person you were made to be

 

New Fiction

Sting by Sandra Brown: When Jordie Bennet and Shaw Kinnard lock eyes across a disreputable backwater bar, something definitely sparks. Shaw gives off a vibe that inspires women to notice. None feel that undercurrent more strongly than Jordie, who doesn’t belong in a seedy dive on the banks of a bayou. But here she is … and Shaw Kinnard is here to kill her.

Curious Minds by Janet Evanovich: Riley Moon is a junior analyst at a mega-bank, when she uncovers what looks like an embezzlement scheme that could lead straight to the top. With his gold gone missing and analysts disappearing, famously eccentric Emerson Knight, the bank’s biggest client, decides to take on his own investigation.

The Kind Folk by Ramsey Campbell: Luke Arnold never felt that he belonged. When his beloved uncle Terence, who Luke felt most close to, a man who wove tales of the “Other”–eldritch beings, hedge folks, and other fables of Celtic myth– suddenly dies, Luke begins to learn how little he really knew his uncle and how serious Terence was about the magic in his tales.

Leave Me by Gayle Forman: Meet Maribeth Klein, a harried working mother who’s so busy taking care of her husband and twins, she doesn’t even realize she’s had a heart attack. Afterward, surprised to discover that her recuperation seems to be an imposition on those who rely on her, Maribeth does the unthinkable: she packs a bag and leaves.

Rise the Dark by Michael Koryta: Drawn to the scene of his wife’s murder when the man responsible is released from prison, investigator Mark Novak races against time to save the life of a woman who has been abducted by the same fanatical killer.

The Jealous Kind by Lee Burke: Intervening when he sees the beautiful and gifted Valerie Epstein fighting with her boyfriend, Aaron Holland Broussard inadvertently challenges the power of the Mob in his Korean War-era Texas community.

A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny: When an intricate old map is found stuffed into the walls of the bistro in Three Pines, it at first seems no more than a curiosity. But the closer the villagers look, the stranger it becomes. Given to Armand Gamache as a gift the first day of his new job, the map eventually leads him to shattering secrets–to an old friend and older adversary.

We Are UnPrepared by Meg Little Reilly: A novel about the next big storm, the one that changes our relationship to nature and each other – the superstorm that threatens to destroy a marriage, a rural Vermont town and the Eastern Seaboard when it hits. The destruction begins months earlier, when fear infects people’s lives and spreads like a plague.

New Young Adult Fiction

Alive by Chandler Baker: After finally receiving a heart transplant, seventeen-year-old Stella throws herself into her new life, but her recovery is marred with strange side effects and hallucinations, and when she meets Levi Zin, a mysterious new boy at her Seattle prep school, Stella soon realizes that she and Levi have more in common than she could ever imagine.  

Tales of the Peculiar by Ransom Riggs: Presents an illustrated edition of the fantastical book featured in the Miss Peregrine series that includes unusual fairy tales about wealthy cannibals, a fork-tongued princess, and the origins of the first ymbryne.

The Witch Hunter by Virginia Boecker: Set in an alternative 16th-century England, Elizabeth Grey is the only girl in the king’s elite group of witch hunters. When she’s framed for being a witch herself, Elizabeth finds freedom at the hands of the world’s most wanted wizard and her loyalties are tested.

Conversion by Katherine Howe: When girls start experiencing strange tics and other mysterious symptoms at Colleen’s high school, her small town of Danvers, Massachusetts, falls victim to rumors that lead to full-blown panic, and only Colleen connects their fate to the ill-fated Salem Village, where another group of girls suffered from a similarly bizarre epidemic three centuries ago.

Powerless by Tera Childs: Kenna feels inferior because everyone else has some talent or power, so when villains break into the lab where she interns she will not let criminals steal the research that will make her extraordinary too, but secrets are spilled and one of the villains saves her life, leading her to think about good and evil, heroes and villains, and what it means to be powerful and powerless.

When by Victoria Laurie: Sixteen-year-old Maddie Flynn cannot help but see the death date of everyone she meets or sees in a photograph or on-screen, and her alcoholic mother exploits this by having her do readings for money, but when Maddie predicts the death of a young boy, she becomes the center of an FBI investigation.

The Keeper by David Baldacci: Vega Jane and her friend Delph have taken the map that Quentin Harris left them and set out from the town of Wormwood, determined to brave the Quag and find freedom on the other side. But the Quag, designed to keep the town people in, it is filled with bloodthirsty creatures and sinister magic, and it is not going to let them escape unscathed.

Fall of Hades by Michael Vey: Michael and the Electroclan embark on their deadliest mission yet. The head of the resistance, known only as the voice, believes that the best way to wipe out the Elgen is to steal their money. That means capturing the Joule, the Elgen boat that serves as a floating treasury.

The Memory of Things by Gae Polisner: Racing to safety after witnessing the first Twin Tower collapse on September 11, 2001, sixteen-year-old Kyle, having been separated from his family, impulsively brings home a traumatized girl who has forgotten who she is.