New Nonfiction

The Little Things by Andy Andrews: They told us “don’t sweat the small stuff,” but sometimes it’s the little things that change everything. Andrews shows that sometimes it is in concentrating on the smaller things that we add value and margin. Whether in business, in life, or in our spiritual connection with God, he provides perspective for meeting small events that can multiply the success of an endeavor.

Bette and Joan: the divine feud by Shaun Considine: Bette Davis and Joan Crawford: two of the deadliest arch-rivals of all time. Born in the same year the two fought bitterly throughout their long and brilliant Hollywood careers.

Between Heaven and the Real World by Steven Chapman: For the first time, Christian music legend Steven Curtis Chapman shares intimate details of his personal journey, his family life, and stories behind some of the most beloved songs of his iconic career.

Old School by Bill O’Reilly: Those crusading against Old School now have a name: Snowflakes. You may have seen them on cable TV whining about social injustice and income inequality. You may have heard them cheering Bernie Sanders as he suggested the government pay for almost everything. The Snowflake movement is proud and loud, and they don’t like Old School grads.

The Truth About Your Future by Ric Edelman: Ric Edelman illustrates how discoveries in robotics, nanotechnology, 3D printing, solar energy, biotechnology, and medicine will redefine our life expectancies, careers, and retirements. As we live and work longer, Edelman provides clear advice on how to recalibrate the way we save for college, invest during our careers, and plan for retirement.

Big Agenda: President Trump’s plan to save America by David Horowitz: Horowitz presents a White House battle plan to halt the Democrats’ march to extinguish the values America holds dear. He details President Trump’s like moves, and explores the opportunities he will have to reshape the American political landscape while securing the nation’s vital security interests abroad.

Unshakeable by Anthony Robbins: Tony Robbins teams up with financial advisor Peter Mallouk to reveal how to become unshakeable — someone who can not only maintain true peace of mind in a world of immense uncertainty, economic volatility, and unprecedented change, but who can profit from the fear that immobilizes so many.

The Apple Cider Vinegar Cleanse by Claire Georgiou: Apple cider vinegar has a cult following among health-conscious consumers. This book explains the myriad health benefits of ACV and will offer a 7-day cleanse to help readers jump-start their weight loss and journey to better health

Jo’s Little Favorites by Nebraska quilter Jo Morton: Provides instructions for small quilts using designs and fabrics for to create an authentic, antique look.

New Fiction

Silence by Shusaku Endo: Two Portuguese Jesuit priests travel to a country hostile to their religion, where feudal lords force the faithful to publicly renounce their beliefs. Eventually captured and forced to watch their Japanese Christian brothers lay down their lives for their faith, the priests bear witness to unimaginable cruelties that test their own beliefs.

The Lost Order by Steve Berry: The Knights of the Golden Circle was the largest clandestine organization in American history. It amassed billions in stolen gold and silver, all buried in hidden caches across the United States. Now, one hundred and sixty years later, two factions of what remains of the Knights of the Golden Circle want that lost treasure–one to spend it for their own ends, the other to preserve it.

The Cuttthroat by Clive Cussler: The year is 1911. Chief Investigator Isaac Bell of the Van Dorn Detective Agency has had many extraordinary cases before. But none quite like this. Hired to find a young woman named Anna Pape who ran away from home to become an actress, Bell gets a shock when her murdered body turns up instead.

Mississippi Blood by Greg Iles: The Double Eagles, a savage KKK splinter group, have declared a personal war on Penn Cage, necessitating 24-hour security protection for him and his family. The toxic bigotry escalates as Penn’s father, Tom, once a respected physician, goes on trial for the murder of his former nurse and one-time lover, Viola Turner, an African-American who was suffering from terminal cancer.

Off the Grid by Alex Kava: Offers four short stories and one novella. All but one feature Kava’s critically acclaimed FBI profiler, Special Agent Maggie O’Dell.

The Chosen by J.R. Ward: The Black Dagger Brotherhood has won a major victory over the Lessening Society, but the threat to their way of life is ever-present and life for the brotherhood is as chaotic as ever

Knit to be Tied by Maggie Sefton: Kelly Flynn and the Lambspun Knitters must come together before their whole town unravels. Newcomer, shy, sweet, and pregnant Nancy Marsted would like to knit a baby hat, and the Lambspun ladies are more than happy to show her the ropes. They share their own pregnancy yarns and soon learn the father of Nancy’s baby isn’t quite the man she dreamed he was.

If Not For You by Debbie Macomber: Having lived under her parents’ thumb for 25 years, Beth Prudhomme is finally taking charge of her own life. Everything is coming together, though her love life leaves something to be desired. Until Nichole introduces Beth to Sam, a tattooed mechanic who’s the epitome of her conservative parents’ worst nightmare.

All By Myself, Alone by Mary Higgins Clark: Fleeing the arrest of her husband-to-be on the eve of their wedding, Celia, a gem expert, escapes on a brand-new cruise ship. On board she meets eighty-six-year-old Lady Emily Haywood, the owner of a priceless emerald necklace that she intends to leave to the Smithsonian after the cruise. Three days out to sea Lady Em is found dead–and the necklace is missing.

New DVDs

Miss Sloane: In the world of political power brokers, Sloane takes on the most powerful opponent of her career and will do whatever is required to win.

Hacksaw Ridge: During the bloodiest battle of WWII, in Okinawa, Desmond Doss saved 75 men without firing or carrying a gun. He was the only American soldier in WWII to fight on the front lines without a weapon, as he believed that while the war was justified, killing was nevertheless wrong. Doss was the first conscientious objector to ever earn the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Assassin’s Creed: Through a revolutionary technology that unlocks his genetic memories, Callum Lynch experiences the adventures of his ancestor, Aguilar, in 15th Century Spain. Callum discovers he is descended from a mysterious secret society, the Assassins, and amasses incredible knowledge and skills to take on the oppressive and powerful Templar organization in the present day.

Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them: Arriving in New York for a brief stopover, cryptozoologist Newt Scamander have come and gone without incident, were it not for a No-Maj (American for Muggle) named Jacob, a misplaced magical case, and the escape of some of Newt’s fantastic beasts, which could spell trouble for both the wizarding and No-Maj worlds.

Fences: In 1950s Pittsburgh, a Black garbage collector named Troy Maxson–bitter that baseball’s color barrier was only broken after his own heyday in the Negro Leagues–is prone to taking out his frustrations on his loved ones. Greer links such seemingly unrelated trends as “rape culture” hysteria and Black Lives Matter to an overall campus mindset intent on elevating and celebrating leftist-designated “protected classes” while intimidating, censoring, and punishing those who disagree with this perversely un-American agenda. He shows that today’s campus madness may eventually dominate much more of America if it is not addressed and reversed soon. Greer links such seemingly unrelated trends as “rape culture” hysteria and Black Lives Matter to an overall campus mindset intent on elevating and celebrating leftist-designated “protected classes” while intimidating, censoring, and punishing those who disagree with this perversely un-American agenda. He shows that today’s campus madness may eventually dominate much more of America if it is not addressed and reversed soon. Greer links such seemingly unrelated trends as “rape culture” hysteria and Black Lives Matter to an overall campus mindset intent on elevating and celebrating leftist-designated “protected classes” while intimidating, censoring, and punishing those who disagree with this perversely un-American agenda. He shows that today’s campus madness may eventually dominate much more of America if it is not addressed and reversed soon.

Moonlight: A young black man struggles to find his place in the world while growing up in a rough neighborhood of Miami.

Passengers: Two passengers aboard a spaceship mysteriously wake from hibernation 90 years before they reach their destination. As Jim and Aurora try to unravel the mystery behind the malfunction, they begin to fall for each other, unable to deny their intense attraction, only to be threatened by the imminent collapse of the ship and the discovery of the truth behind why they woke up.

Sing: A koala impresario stages a grand singing competition for the world’s animals in order to save his elegant theater and bring it back to its former glory.

The Secret Life of Pets: A hilarious comedy about the lives our pets lead after we leave for work or school each day. Max, a terrier, has his favorite-pet status turned upside-down when his owner takes in a stray named Duke.

Arrival: When mysterious spacecraft touch down around the world, a team, including linguist Louise Banks, is brought together to investigate. As humankind teeters on the verge of global war, Banks and the team race against time for answers, and to find them, she will take a chance that could threaten her life, and quite possibly humanity.

New Nonfiction

Modern Death by Haider Warraich: Dr. Warraich takes a broader look at how we die today, from the cellular level up to the very definition of death itself. The most basic aspects of dying–the whys, wheres, whens, and hows–are almost nothing like what they were mere decades ago. Beyond its ecology, epidemiology, and economics, the very ethos of death has changed.

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Drawing extensively on her own experiences and her deep understanding of the often masked realities of sexual politics, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman now – and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.

Ripper: the secret life of Walter Sickert by Patricia Cornwell: Examines the century-old series of murders that terrorized London in the 1800s, drawing on research, state-of-the-art forensic science, and insights into the criminal mind to reveal the true identity of the infamous Jack the Ripper.

Gosnell by Ann McElhinney: In 2013 Dr. Kermit Gosnell was convicted of killing four people, including three babies, but is thought to have killed hundreds, perhaps thousands more in a 30-year killing spree. This book reveals how the investigation that brought Gosnell to justice started as a routine drugs investigation and turned into a shocking unmasking of America’s biggest serial killer.

No Campus for White Men by Scott Greer: Greer links such seemingly unrelated trends as “rape culture” hysteria and Black Lives Matter to an overall campus mindset intent on elevating and celebrating leftist-designated “protected classes” while intimidating, censoring, and punishing those who disagree with this perversely un-American agenda.

The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben: A forester’s fascinating stories, supported by the latest scientific research, reveal the extraordinary world of forests and illustrate how trees communicate and care for each other.

The Highway Kind: Thrilling crime stories about cars, driving, and the road from the world’s bestselling and critically acclaimed writers. Including entirely new stories from Michael Connelly, C.J. Box, Diana Gabaldon, James Sallis, Ace Atkins, Luis Alberto Urrea, Sara Gran, Ben H. Winters, and Joe Lansdale, THE HIGHWAY KIND is a street-level look at modern America, as seen through one of its national obsessions.

An American Genocide by Benjamin Madley: Between 1846 and 1873, California’s Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Benjamin Madley is the first historian to uncover the full extent of the slaughter, the involvement of state and federal officials, the taxpayer dollars that supported the violence, indigenous resistance, who did the killing, and why the killings ended.