New Nonfiction

Modern Death by Haider Warraich: Dr. Warraich takes a broader look at how we die today, from the cellular level up to the very definition of death itself. The most basic aspects of dying–the whys, wheres, whens, and hows–are almost nothing like what they were mere decades ago. Beyond its ecology, epidemiology, and economics, the very ethos of death has changed.

We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Drawing extensively on her own experiences and her deep understanding of the often masked realities of sexual politics, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman now – and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.

Ripper: the secret life of Walter Sickert by Patricia Cornwell: Examines the century-old series of murders that terrorized London in the 1800s, drawing on research, state-of-the-art forensic science, and insights into the criminal mind to reveal the true identity of the infamous Jack the Ripper.

Gosnell by Ann McElhinney: In 2013 Dr. Kermit Gosnell was convicted of killing four people, including three babies, but is thought to have killed hundreds, perhaps thousands more in a 30-year killing spree. This book reveals how the investigation that brought Gosnell to justice started as a routine drugs investigation and turned into a shocking unmasking of America’s biggest serial killer.

No Campus for White Men by Scott Greer: Greer links such seemingly unrelated trends as “rape culture” hysteria and Black Lives Matter to an overall campus mindset intent on elevating and celebrating leftist-designated “protected classes” while intimidating, censoring, and punishing those who disagree with this perversely un-American agenda.

The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben: A forester’s fascinating stories, supported by the latest scientific research, reveal the extraordinary world of forests and illustrate how trees communicate and care for each other.

The Highway Kind: Thrilling crime stories about cars, driving, and the road from the world’s bestselling and critically acclaimed writers. Including entirely new stories from Michael Connelly, C.J. Box, Diana Gabaldon, James Sallis, Ace Atkins, Luis Alberto Urrea, Sara Gran, Ben H. Winters, and Joe Lansdale, THE HIGHWAY KIND is a street-level look at modern America, as seen through one of its national obsessions.

An American Genocide by Benjamin Madley: Between 1846 and 1873, California’s Indian population plunged from perhaps 150,000 to 30,000. Benjamin Madley is the first historian to uncover the full extent of the slaughter, the involvement of state and federal officials, the taxpayer dollars that supported the violence, indigenous resistance, who did the killing, and why the killings ended.

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