New Nonfiction Titles

Office 2016 Simplified by Elaine Marmel: the quick, easy, full-color guide to the new features and tools of the latest version of Office. With a clear, highly visual, introductory style of instruction, this book gives you step-by-step directions alongside illustrative screen shots to help you learn Microsoft’s bestselling productivity software.

Killing England by Bill O’Reilly: Told through the eyes of George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and Great Britain’s King George III, the authors chronicle the path to independence in gripping detail, taking the reader from the battlefields of America to the royal courts of Europe.

The Operator by Robert O’Neil: The Operator ranges across SEAL Team Operator Robert O’Neill’s awe-inspiring four-hundred-mission career, which included his involvement in attempts to rescue “Lone Survivor” Marcus Luttrell and abducted-by-Somali-pirates Captain Richard Phillips and which culminated in those famous three shots that dispatched the world’s most wanted terrorist, Osama bin Laden.

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer: Schumer mines her past for stories about her teenage years, family, relationships, and sex, and shares the experiences that have shaped who she is–a woman with the courage to bare her soul to stand up for what she believes in, all while making us laugh.

Our Revolution by Bernard Sanders: And for the millions looking to continue the political revolution, Bernie outlines a progressive economic, environmental, racial, and social justice agenda that will create jobs, raise wages, protect the environment, and provide health care for all — and ultimately transform our country and our world for the better.

The Big Lie by Dinesh D’Souza: Dinesh D’Souza reveals: why Benito Mussolini and Adolf Hitler admired the Democratic Party (and why the fascists and National Socialists identified with the progressive Left); how Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger inspired Nazi racial theorists; how leftist philosophers have intentionally (if covertly) promoted and justified Nazi tactics and the fascist ideal of the all-powerful centralized state; why the anti-free-speech, anti-capitalist, anti-religious-liberty, pro-violence, pro-abortion Democratic Party is a national socialist (Nazi) party in everything but name.

What Happened by Hilary Rodham Clinton: The former secretary of state relates her experiences as the first woman candidate nominated for president by a major party and reveals what she was thinking and feeling during one of the most controversial and unpredictable presidential elections in history.

The Retreat of Western Liberalism by Edward Luce: Combining on-the-ground reporting with intelligent synthesis of the literature and economic analysis, Luce offers a detailed projection of the consequences of the Trump administration, the rise of European populism, and a forward-thinking analysis of what those who believe in enlightenment values must do to defend himself from the multiple onslaughts they face in the coming years.

New Fiction Titles

The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott (Large Print): In Catholic Brooklyn, in the early part of the twentieth century, decorum, superstition, and shame collude to erase a man’s brief existence, and yet his suicide, although never spoken of, reverberates through many lives–testing the limits and the demands of love and sacrifice, of forgiveness and forgetfulness, even through multiple generations.

The Good Daughter by Karin Slaughter (Large Print): Twenty-eight years ago, Charlotte and Samantha Quinn’s happy small-town family life was torn apart by a terrifying attack on their family home. It left their mother dead. It left their father–Pikeville’s notorious defense attorney–devastated. And it left the family fractured beyond repair, consumed by secrets from that terrible night.

Texas Takedown by Heather Woodhaven (Large Print): Presenting her research findings at an oceanology conference should be marine biologist Isabelle Barrows’ big break — until she spots two men chasing her. With shadowy assailants on her tail, impressing potential investors becomes the least of her concerns. Especially when the men chase her straight into the arms of her high school crush.

The Asphalt Warrior by Gary Reilly: Murph’s world consists mostly of fares and doormen and fellow hacks from the Rocky Mountain Taxicab Company. He has two main goals in life. First, to earn no more than it takes to keep his bohemian lifestyle afloat. Second, never under any circumstances get involved in the lives of his fares. He’s not very good with the first issue and spectacularly bad with the second.

An Echo of Murder by Anne Perry: A Hungarian immigrant is a victim of a gruesome murder. Commander William Monk suspects a local killer, but when another victim is found he begins to think the murderer is an outsider.

The Other Girl by Erica Spindler: From the New York Times bestselling author of Justice for Sara and The First Wife comes The Other Girl, a chilling new thriller about a ritualistic murder of a college professor that sends a small town cop back into the trauma she thought she’d put behind her.

A Stranger in the House by Shari Lapena: You’re home making dinner for your husband. You expect him any second. The phone rings–it’s the call you hoped you’d never get. You jump in your car and race to a neighborhood you thought you’d never visit. You peer into the dark, deserted building. You brace yourself for the worst. And then, you remember nothing else.

A Column of Fire by Ken Follett: In 1558, the ancient stones of Kingsbridge Cathedral look down on a city torn apart by religious conflict. As power in England shifts precariously between Catholics and Protestants, royalty and commoners clash, testing friendship, loyalty, and love.

 

New Graphic Novels

The Mystery Knight by Ben Avery: A full-color graphic rendering of the novella set a century before the events of the Game of Thrones series continues the adventures of noble but impoverished hedge knight Duncan and his bold squire and Daenerys’s great-grandfather, the future King Aegon V.

The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Book One by Robert Aguirre-Sacasa: On the eve of her sixteenth birthday, the young sorceress Sabrina Spellman finds herself at a crossroads, having to choose between an unearthly destiny and her mortal boyfriend, Harvey. But a foe from her family’s past has arrived in Greendale, Madame Satan, and she has her own deadly agenda.

Tetris by Box Brown: It is, perhaps, the perfect video game. Simple yet addictive, Tetris delivers an irresistible, unending puzzle that has players hooked. Computer scientist Alexey Pajitnov had big ideas about games. In 1984, he created Tetris in his spare time while developing software for the Soviet government. Once Tetris emerged from behind the Iron Curtain, it was an instant hit.

The Wicked + The Divine by Kieron Gillen: Every ninety years, twelve gods return as young people. They are loved. They are hated. In two years, they are all dead. It’s happening now. It’s happening again.

March Book One by John Lewis: March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis’ lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis’ personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.

Monstress Volume One by Marjorie Liu: Set in an alternate world of art deco beauty and steampunk horror, Monstress tells the epic story of Maika Halfwolf, a teenage survivor of a cataclysmic war between humans and their hated enemies, the Arcanics. In the face of oppression and terrible danger, Maika is both hunter and hunted, searching for answers about her mysterious past as those who seek to use her remain just one step behind … and all the while, the monster within begins to awaken

Amazing Fantastic Incredible by Stan Lee: In this gorgeously illustrated, full-color graphic memoir, Stan Lee–comic book legend and cocreator of Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Avengers, the Incredible Hulk, and a legion of other Marvel superheroes–shares his iconic legacy and the story of how modern comics came to be.

Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” by Miles Hyman: In a graphic-novel adaptation of the classic spine-tingler, the grandson of the story’s original author depicts the eerie town and their shocking ritual in detailed four-color panels that breathe new life into the iconic tale.

Orange: the complete collection by Ichigo Takano: When sixteen-year-old Takamiya Naho receives a mysterious letter, claiming to be from her twenty-seven-year-old self, her life is suddenly thrown into flux. The letter informs her that a new transfer student by the name of Naruse Kakeru will be joining her class, and to keep her eye on him. What is Naho to make of the letter’s contents and its cryptic warning?