Archive for the 'North Platte History' Category

The Mighty Dandelion!

Originally published to facebook.com/NorthPlattePL on 4/9/2021. Today’s historic look back looks at the most common, invasive weed: the mighty dandelion! We hope you enjoy this humorous, and informational look at eradicating dandelions over the years! Now, we Nebraskans know a thing or two about getting rid of dandelions. Before herbicides and chemicals, townspeople became very […]

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Salute to Nellie Snyder Yost

Originally published to Facebook.com/NorthPlattePL on April 2, 2021. Today’s North Platte History Story is a belated salute to Women’s History Month, which just ended on March 31st. We are highlighting a wonderful, inspirational North Platte woman, historian and author — Nellie Snyder Yost. She was only 4 foot 8 inches tall, but she was mighty […]

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Hendy-Ogier Auto Company

Originally published to Facebook.com/NorthPlattePL on March 26, 2021. Our History Series looks back over 100 years ago to… February 27th, 1912 a partnership was formed when Edwin Ogier and William Hendy leased the LeMasters garage at 215 East 6th, North Platte, Nebraska They formed a partnership to sell cars, specifically Ford automobiles. In case you […]

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North Platte High School #4

Originally published to Facebook.com/NorthPlattePL on March 19, 2021. Today we continue our salute to North Platte Schools and Education History-with a look at the North Platte High School building, the fourth high school facility built in approximately 1930 and demolished in 2003. This is the high school that many of our readers will remember. Read […]

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The 1921 Flood

Originally posted to Facebook.com/NorthPlattePL on March 12, 2021. Nearly 100 years ago, on Monday, June 13, 1921 at 2:00 pm, the south two piers of the South Platte River Bridge collapsed. This event impacted travel, trade, and supplies between the city and the south end of the county for months. The bridge was less than […]

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